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Writing Center Workshops

For Students

Fall 2018 Academic Workshops

Dates to be announced

Making Sense of a Journal Article
Learn the secrets to efficiently reading a scholarly or peer-reviewed journal article. You will be able to better scan, understand, and summarize articles for your assignments.

This is Not What We Did in High School: Writing Thesis Statements at the College Level 
Your college professors expect you to write differently than what your high school teachers accepted. Learn how to read texts to come up with strong thesis statements for college-level papers.

Using Powerful Paraphrases to Avoid Plagiarism
No quotes allowed? Learn how to include information from published sources using your own words effectively and accurately with guidance from the Writing Center.

Digging into APA-Style Citations 
This workshop will provide a valuable handout and teach you how to correctly cite and reference your sources according to APA-style guidelines. 

Revising for a Better Grade
Do you ever wonder after receiving feedback on a paper how you can give your professors “what they want” and get a better grade? This workshop will give you practical strategies for revising and editing your paper so you can meet your professor’s expectations. 


For Faculty

We are pleased to offer the following in-class workshops for graduate and undergraduate classes.

Please keep in mind that Writing Center workshops are meant to complement and/or supplement the writing instruction that takes place within courses. This means we need your input if your workshop is to be successful. Providing us with the following items at least two weeks in advance of your session will be most helpful:

  • A copy of the assignment you are currently working on
  • The assignment’s rubric or grading criteria
  • An example of what you deem as exemplary work for this assignment

To book a workshop or discuss other workshop possibilities, please contact Rachel Edwards at re333@cabrini.edu.

We recommend booking your workshop early in the semester as our schedule quickly becomes full.


In-Class Workshops for Undergraduates

APA Citation

Do your undergraduate students struggle with why, when and how to cite and integrate sources?  By providing students with reasons why citation is important including the academic and professional implications, this workshop motivates students to want to learn to cite correctly. This hands-on workshop shows students how to use technological tools to create citations, locate pertinent information or identify and correct errors in entries provided by electronic resources. 

Applying Your Professor's Written Feedback for a Better Grade

Do you ever wonder why, after receiving feedback on a paper, students don’t make the changes you expect? This workshop will help students decide and focus on what is most important to you based on your comments.  Strategies will then be provided and practiced that enable students to translate this commentary into actual tangible changes that will improve their final drafts.

 Students need to bring a paper with your feedback to work on during this workshop. 

Composing Annotated Bibliographies

Learning to concisely and accurately summarize is one of the foundational skills required for researchers in the humanities, sciences and social sciences.  By having students compose annotated bibliographies, they can begin to practice this skill as well as understand how to analyze the research of others so they can recognize gaps and begin to position their projects within their fields. Most importantly, these bibliographies form the foundation for the synthesis of their sources within literature reviews.  Through this workshop, students will learn how to craft strong annotated bibliographies through deconstructing example bibliographies and evaluating their own.  Moreover, they will be supplied with a checklist to ensure they are easily able to apply what they learned as they create their final products. 

Prior to this workshop, students should locate a few sources for the research project they are currently working on.

Developing, Organizing and Supporting Arguments

Strong thesis statements are at the core of every well-developed and organized academic argument.  Yet, students often don’t know how to create a thesis statement that is arguable, explicit and limits the scope of their papers based on prompt instructions, class readings and their own research.  Using a class assignment, students will produce a thesis statement in this workshop.  They will then learn how to use their thesis statements to organize, construct and develop paragraphs stemming from that thesis.

Introduction to the Writing Center

This workshop introduces students to the concept of a writing center, especially what services we offer and why.  Students will also learn how to use our new online scheduling system, WCONLINE.

Literature Reviews                                                                           

For students in research-based capstone courses, this workshop shows students how to utilize an annotated bibliography to summarize, analyze and apply sources to their own projects so they create well synthesized literature reviews.

Students should be working on or have completed an annotated bibliography for their final research projects prior to this workshop.

Peer Review

Many students often are not committed to the writing process, particularly editing and revision, because they find it difficult to identify errors within their own papers.  As research has shown, some of these difficulties arise from the fact that students automatically add or correct material in their heads when they read their own work. Often students find it is easier, therefore, to start with identifying sentence-level errors and provide feedback on theses, paragraphing, organization and responsiveness to the prompt when responding to the papers of their peers.  Within this workshop using the drafts of their peers, students will learn how to separate the editing and revision processes as well as identify and correct common errors.  They will then learn how to apply these processes and error identification strategies to their own drafts. 

Students must bring draft of a current assignment to this workshop.

Quoting vs. Paraphrasing vs. Summarizing

When writing for advanced courses, students must learn how to use sources within texts more effectively, particularly if they are citing studies or reflecting on complex theoretical texts.  Knowing when and how to quote vs. paraphrase vs. summarize becomes crucial.  Through discussion and a variety of examples, students will learn what makes an effective paraphrase and summary and how to paraphrase and summarize without plagiarizing.  They will also create summaries in preparation for the creation of an annotated bibliography or reflection.

Students must bring a source or reading for the application portion of this workshop.

This is Not What We Did in High School:  Writing at the College-Level

There has been much research that shows what is taught about writing and expected of writers in high school is very different from what is expected of writers when they enter college.  Helping students understand and learn how to effectively address these differences in audience and disciplinary genres are crucial for their college success.  Centering on critical thinking and analysis, students are taught how to come up with sophisticated ideas in response to a reading through annotation that will be the basis for the creation of college-level texts.


In-Class Workshops for Graduate Students

APA Citation

Do your graduate students struggle with why, when and how to cite and integrate sources?  By providing students with reasons why citation is important including the academic and professional implications, this workshop motivates students to want to learn to cite correctly. This hands-on workshop shows students how to use technological tools to create citations, locate pertinent information or identify and correct errors in entries provided by electronic resources. 

Composing Annotated Bibliographies

Learning to concisely and accurately summarize is one of the foundational skills of graduate researchers must develop.  By having students compose annotated bibliographies, they can begin to practice this skill as well as understand how to analyze the research of others so they can recognize gaps and begin to position their projects within their fields. Most importantly, these bibliographies form the foundation for the synthesis of their sources within literature reviews.  Through this workshop, students will learn how to craft strong annotated bibliographies through deconstructing example bibliographies and evaluating their own.  Moreover, they will be supplied with a checklist to ensure they are easily able to apply what they learned as they create their final products. 

Prior to this workshop, students should locate a few sources for the research project they are currently working on.

Introduction to the Writing Center- Graduate Students

This workshop introduces graduate students to the types of writing they will encounter as graduate students and how the writing center can help.  Students will also learn how to access writing center services via new online scheduling system, WCONLINE.

Literature Reviews for Action Research

Action research requires current and future teachers to investigate the efficacy, impact or implications of enacted solutions to actual problems encountered in the classroom.  Thus, the literature reviews for these projects ask students to search for and include sources that identify similar problems and provide solutions.  Building on their annotated bibliographies, students will learn how to summarize, analyze and apply problems and solutions from other studies to aspects of their own investigations within their literature reviews.

Traditional Literature Reviews

Writing the literature review can be one of the most challenging tasks for new graduate students. This workshop shows students how to utilize an annotated bibliography to summarize, analyze and apply sources to their own projects so they create well synthesized literature reviews. It also emphasizes the importance of the depth and breadth of research required at the graduate-level prior to embarking on their own studies or dissertations. 

Students should be working on or have completed an annotated bibliography for their final research projects prior to this workshop.

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