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Late-Start Courses 

Courses that begin later in the semester allow students who change their schedule to start on day one. 

Late-Start Classes – Fall 2018

COL 125 A (CRN 10314) – Career Planning and Exploration

Meets Tuesdays, beginning October 22 until December 14

1:55 pm to 3:10 pm         Founders Room 106         Hybrid format    1 credit, Pass/Fail grade

This course provides students with the ability to conduct career planning and develop career skills. Students complete diverse assessments to evaluate and verify personal preferences, identify marketable and transferable skills, refine résumés, research opportunities, network, and develop all of the tools necessary to enhance their job marketability. Students enrolled in the course are required to attend additional workshops and/or events on and off campus in order to meet the necessary requirements to receive credit.

DVA 121 OL (11047) – Domestic Violence Awareness for Educators

Meets online, beginning October 22 until November 30

Online course   1 credit        Standard Letter grade

Domestic Violence is a serious and widespread problem that affects all economic, educational, social, geographic, racial, ethnic, and regional groups. Studies estimate that between 3.3 million and 10 million children in the United States witness violence in their own homes each year (Straus, 1992; Fantuzzo & Mohr, 1999; Haeseler, 2006; Edelson, 1999) With a knowledge of these statistics it is easy to understand why many children come to school frightened, angry, afraid, lonely, confused, ashamed, unprepared to learn, and emotionally unstable because of witnessing family violence in the home. Trauma can undermine children’s ability to learn, children will have difficulty forming healthy relationships and they will have difficulty functioning appropriately in the classrooms. This course examines the impact witnessing domestic violence can have on children and the strategies a teacher, social worker, counselor, and other school personnel will need to have in order to work with these children effectively.

DVA 521 OL (10046) – Domestic Violence Awareness for Educators – Graduate Program Students only

Meets online, beginning October 22 until November 30

Online course   1 credit       Standard Letter grade

Domestic Violence is a serious and widespread problem that affects all economic, educational, social, geographic, racial, ethnic, and regional groups. Studies estimate that between 3.3 million and 10 million children in the United States witness violence in their own homes each year (Straus, 1992; Fantuzzo & Mohr, 1999; Haeseler, 2006; Edelson, 1999) With a knowledge of these statistics it is easy to understand why many children come to school frightened, angry, afraid, lonely, confused, ashamed, unprepared to learn, and emotionally unstable because of witnessing family violence in the home. Trauma can undermine children’s ability to learn, children will have difficulty forming healthy relationships and they will have difficulty functioning appropriately in the classrooms. This course examines the impact witnessing domestic violence can have on children and the strategies a teacher, social worker, counselor, and other school personnel will need to have in order to work with these children effectively.

ENG 234 B (CRN 10974) – Writing for Leadership 

Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, beginning October 23 until December 15

1:55 pm to 4:30 pm         Holy Spirit Library Room 3A          Lecture format   3 credits, Standard Letter grade  

Writing for Leadership is a writing intensive course "Values" course designed for students of all majors. In this course, students will study a variety of modes of professional communication—including leadership statements, mission statements, email, performance reviews, and SWOT analyses—to communicate in ways that are complementary to both organizational mission and leadership style. Applying contemporary case studies, students will learn how to communicate with a variety of stakeholders, relay important information, address conflict, evaluate employees, and articulate important plans and projects from multiple organizational positions.

HIS 252 OL (10252) – Survey of Latin American History II

Meets online, beginning October 22 until December 15

Online course   3 credits   Standard Letter grade

 This course covers the growth and development of Hispanic America from the emergence of Independence movements to the present. Course stresses the post-revolutionary struggles of Latin American people.  Formerly offered as HIS 306; not repeatable.

HIS 400 A (10327) – Special Topics in History: 1968

Meets one time on Saturday, November 3

8:00 am to 5:00 pm      Widener Lecture Hall   Hybrid format   1 credit    Standard Letter grade

The instructor selects content of this upper-division course keeping in mind the needs of the students and providing experimental coursework at an advanced level.

HIS 400 C (11045) – Special Topics in History: History Forum

Meets one day face to face on Wednesday, November 14; first at 11:05 am in the Mansion, and then later at 7:30 pm in the Mansion; remainder of course is online  1 credit, Standard Letter grade

The instructor selects content of this upper-division course keeping in mind the needs of the students and providing experimental coursework at an advanced level.

PED 123 A (CRN 10284) – Pilates

Meets Mondays and Wednesdays, beginning October 10 until November 14

11:05 am to 12:20 pm    Dixon Center 209               Lecture format     1 credit, Pass/Fail grade

Pilates is a method of body conditioning designed to stretch, strengthen and lengthen the muscles of the body emphasizing the core.  This form of exercise was created to improve balance, flexibility and posture.  The mat work focuses on the body's core stability while engaging the abdominal muscles and incorporating a rhythmic breath.  This technique will train the body to work as a unit and will generate a sense of well being.  In as little as ten sessions you will feel the difference, in twenty you will see the difference, and in thirty you will have a new body. 

PED 124 A (CRN 10470) – Spinning

Meets Wednesdays and Fridays, beginning October 10 until November 14

3:15 pm to 4:30 pm        Dixon Center 233          Lecture format     1 credit, Pass/Fail grade

This course will utilize the foundations of the traditional Spinning program. Students will learn about the fundamentals of a basic spin class including bike setup, hand positioning, and ride development.  This is a physically active class with a lot of spinning!  Sneakers and fitness clothing are required for every class. 

PSY 200 A (CRN 10965) – Explorations of Technology in Human Development

Meets Mondays and Wednesdays, beginning October 22 until December 10

12:30 pm to 1:45 pm      Founders 203           Lecture format      1 credit, Pass/Fail grade

This course will explore the increasingly immersive role of technology on the unfolding of human development across the lifespan. Discussion will include an exploration of the impact of technology on areas such as brain development, cognitive development, social development, memory, self-regulation, attention, and relationships. 

SOW 212 OL (CRN 10434) – Family Violence

Beginning October 21 until December 15

Online format     3 credits,  Standard Letter grade

This Social Work elective course aims to uncover the dynamics involved in the taboo subject of family violence.  The underlying values and norms related to family, community, the state, and society are explored as they shape and, sometimes constrain, responses to children and others affected by family violence.  The course provides an overview of the various forms of family violence and approaches to understanding their effects on family members, with particular emphasis on child witnesses to domestic violence.  Social, economic, and political factors are critically examined.  Intervention approaches such as risk assessment and maximizing collaboration among community resources are addressed.  Meets Values Exploration 

 

The full Term Master Schedule is available at cabrini.edu/WebTMS.

  • Students should see their advisor about registering for a late-start course. 
  • Registration forms, available from the Cavalier Express Center, must be signed by students’ advisors.

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